New York Anticipation

diasteme_4764New legislation in New York State would make it possible for people to have their pet’s cremated remains (a.k.a. cremains) interred with them in certain NY cemeteries.

Originally introduced on March 21, 2013 by Republican Mike Ranzenhofer and cosponsored by Democrat Tony Avella, Bill S4322 already passed the Senate this past March in a landslide vote of 60-0 (with one abstention). It now awaits deliberation by the NYS Assembly (follow its progress here). The bill – which only pertains to cemeteries governed by the NYS Cemetery Board – permits those cemeteries to offer this option. Continue reading

Virginia General Assembly to Consider Bill allowing Pets to be Buried beside Humans

Update: On April 3, 2014, the Virginia Governor signed HB 588 into law.

The Virginia State Capitol - Thomas Jefferson's "Temple to Democracy"

The Virginia State Capitol – Thomas Jefferson’s “Temple to Democracy”

A bill (HB 588) was introduced in the Virginia General Assembly that would amend the State Cemetery Code to allow human cemeteries to designate a special section for the burial of human remains with their companion animals in adjacent graves. It was introduced by republican Delegate Israel O’Quinn with Delegate A. Benton Chafin, Jr. as Chief Co-Patron.

The issue was brought to Delegate O’Quinn’s attention by Kelly Farris, co-owner of Farris Funeral Services, who has been receiving increasing requests from folk who want to keep their family intact in death as they were in life. Continue reading

Two New Green Cemeteries!

summer wishes [Explored!]

The Green Pet-Burial Society is happy to announce two new green cemeteries:

  • Prairie Creek Conservation Cemetery in Gainesville, FL
  • Greenhaven Preserve in Eastover, SC.

Both are listed on our Providers webpage. Greenhaven Preserve includes both, a family cemetery and a pet cemetery.  Continue reading

Call for Papers – Animal Death symposium

Anna MerrittAnimal Death. June 13, 2012, University of Sydney Camperdown Campus. This symposium brings together cross-disciplinary voices on the topic of Animal Death. It seeks papers that explore how animal and human death are conceptualized, diverge, differ and also connect in profound ways. Papers could explore issues of sacrifice, “necessary” expendability, utility, species extinction, human survival, climate change and conservation. They are particularly interested in human and animal relationships around the nature of death. These include (but not limited to) issues of grief (for the dead companion animal), euthanasia, rituals of slaughter, vivisection, cultures of denial, the issue of who is and isn’t attributed a soul, and post-death belief systems. Please send 200 word abstracts to Dr Jay Johnston by January 16, 2012. Panels of up to three speakers are welcome. Continue reading